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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 55 (some duplicates have been removed)
've had those things happen, do they have a productive environment to solve problems? not necessarily. they're still overcoming the divisiveness, the hard feelings from all of that." at the time reporters wanted to know whether rick snyder would support what is known as a right to work law. the idea of right to work is simple. under a right to work law, employees of a union shop don't have to pay union dues. the employees get the benefit of the union, the higher wages and better health care, all of that, but they do not have to pay for it. why pay money if you can have something for free? for unions, the results of this are close to catastrophic which is why republicans and big business love right to work laws. they are a way of destroying unions. the same heritage foundation that will be jim demint's new home says union membership fell by 15% in states that passed right to work. union organizing fell by half, passing a right to work law stops unions and it stops organizing. on the labor left, the economic policy institute reports that wages fall by more than 3% after you institute ri
to implement. i will say, however, that the value of doing it now in a low interest rate environment is substantially larger on these new loans for two reasons. the lower the interest rate, the faster the amortization of the principal and therefore this will be a more valuable change. second because these loans are so low interest rate, they will be on our books far larger. frankly, not many loans in the past have hit that limit. so even though it's $1 trillion portfolio, the value of that change is quite small for the old loans. it's really going to be quite valuable for these newer very low interest rate loans. >> i'll be briefly two more questions. i see that f.h.a. is now making loans to people who three years ago were foreclosed upon. and that's a very different standard than even exists at fannie and freddie. i don't understand. why are you doing that? >> this is another area where we are working on changes. here's the issue. we have a significant number of homeowners that were responsible homeowners, had good credit scores that lost their jobs in the biggest economic crisis th
will say, however, that the value of doing it now in a low interest rate environment is larger on these new loans for two reasons. the lower the interest rate, the faster the amortization of the principal. therefore, this will be a more valuable change. second, because these loans are so low interest rate, they will be on our books far longer. not many loans in the past have hit that limit. even though it is $1 trillion, the value of the change is small for the old loans. it is going to be valuable for these newer, very low interest rate loans. >> briefly two more questions. i see that f.h.a. is now making loans to people who three years ago were foreclosed upon. and that is a very different standard than even exists at fannie and freddie. why are you doing that? put this is another area where we are working on changes. responsible hone owners got good credit scores that lost their jobs. we believe somebody can show that they are back to work and a responsible borer again. that is someone we would work with. i would agree that our standards are not clear enough in dividing those. so what we
because we're stuck in a real tough environment right now with that darn fiscal cliff deadline looming, three weeks away, our political leaders getting absolutely nowhere -- >> buy buy buy! >> sell sell sell! >> it doesn't mean we stop searching for opportunities to make money. even in the most dismal markets there are always stocks that have the ability to go higher. just got to find them. takes a lot of work. one i've been doing a lot of work on, it's called dst systems. dog sam tom. now, dst is not a great business. hmm. but i think it could be a terrific stock. the reason? i see number signs suggesting that dst could be preparing itself for a sale. and if not, it sure as heck should be. but even if dst doesn't get bought out, it has a fabulous story. it's a tale that we've repeated over and over again. it's one that's made big money in a number of stocks for us. see, dst, which is just a terrible name for a company, but that's what they call themselves, is a company where the whole is currently worth a lot less than the parts. now, in recent months dst has started to get aggressive
and cared about the environment. those things are important to me. when the party start eed moving away from those thing and taking away the sunday before election to vote. there's a great tradition after church to go and vote in states that have early voting. it just seemed to me there was real suppression going on, it wasn't a tolerant party, it wasn't doing what was right for the environment or public education. i'm a public school kid. my dad was on the school board when i was a kid. i have three sisters, two have been public school teachers here in florida. i have a heart for that kind of thing, and it means an awful lot to me. people have told me for a long time, chris, charlie, you have really been a democrat, you just didn't know it. i mean, these are people that i went to college with and went to law school with. >> are you going to lead the charge -- >> so i'm bloglad to be here. >> are you going to lead the charge around the country for people who were republicans to become democrats. >> i think they should if we were like me. sort of middle of the road and common sense republican
making the environment cleaner and better from a government's he perspective. how do you attract businesses and money and private investment into climate change and protecting the environment? >> well, i think they need certainty. what i hear from businesses is -- i've been doing this almost 23 years. we need certainty. we want to invest or money, but we want to know the rules aren't going to change. if carbon pollution is a bad thing, which we know we need to control it, that i'm not going to be disadvantaged because i'm clean. in fact, it would be great if i'm advantaged, but don't put me on a playing field that makes it harder for me to compete. i think what we have to do, we find businesses all over the country cutting their energy use, cutting their water use, increasing their profits by doing it. we have to lift them up, because they can show the way for other businesses that might be too small or too busy to realize the opportunities are there. >> what's your plan for the second term? are you sticking around? >> you know what? what i can say is i'm very committed to these
an environment in which we can care for the elderly. >> the think americans will remain optimistic but this did of the economy? if we have not tackle the things we have just talked about like the cost of education, the housing market? we are figuring out some philosophical issues about taxing and funding? >> i think the economy has been growing slowly and steadily all in the absence of any movement, which we have seen over the test of the last year. i have worked on guantanamo for the past 10 years. my sense is that if there is some movement until the positive direction, which have not seen out of washington and enter a long time, -- in a long time, at least we will not see head winds. we are making some progress. i see that continue. >> i want to come back to what todd said earlier. i am concerned about confidence being fragile. todd reference what happened until august of 2011. we saw in limited to lie confidence tank. market confidence grew jog with some of the market confidence plunged. i think we have to be concerned -- market confidence plunged. if we look like we are not grappling with t
in such a highly charged political environment, that we should change the senate rules to make it more efficient, more responsive to the public mood, more like the house of representatives. i appreciate the frustration many have with the slow pace of the legislative process, thus i can understand the temptation to change the rules that make the senate so unique and simultaneously so frustrating." but senator dodd continued, "whether such a temptation is motivated by a noble desire to speed up the process, or by pure political expedience, i believe such changes would be unwise." in conclusion senator dodd said -- quote -- "we 100 senators are but temporary stewards of a unique american institution founded upon universal principles. the senate was designed to be different, not simply for the sake of variety but because the framers believed that the senate could and should be the venue in which statesmen would lift america up to meet its unique challenges." those who know both senator dodd and me know that we didn't agree on much during our years together in the senate. however, on this point i hav
-free environment. i'm a big football fan. i was cheering for alabama this weekend. we love rg in washington. but i don't really need to hear the politics in the football. obviously i'm a big, you know, second amendment person. i mean, i have am for gun rights. he doesn't -- he didn't know as much as he thought he knew i think before he went into his commentary. >> bill: i think i crystallized it with a brilliant analogy. >> of course. >> and that was when i said to costas look, you are in the theater, you are in aurora, colorado, and the guy comes in with a gun and he starts shooting it up. which would you rather have? would you be armed so you could shoot back at this guy or would you rather be on the floor hoping you don't get a bullet in the head? and he honestly said that he he would rather be -- and that's the difference. >> think about it. he also said something that he said well, i am against the sale of automatic weapons and military style artillery. well, that's already banned. okay. so, he is against that but that's already banned. he doesn't know about the studies by gary in the 90's or
. the environmental community can see a reduction in the amount of carbon and an improvement in the environment as well as conservatives can see the idea of leaving it more resources at home and sending less of our wealth abroad. this is a way of doing something different, which is creating a consensus to get something done in the next congress. we are excited for the next congress and to work with all legislators to implement these recommendations and see them through to their felon. i would like to call fred smith, the chairman and founder of fedex. he really needs no introduction. but the truth is fedex and what it is done in our economy is groundbreaking. they are the clipper ships of the modern age. what they see in terms of the economic growth of our country, because they touch every industry, as well as providing the transportation to making our economy grow, i think he is well-suited to discuss this issue. i thank him for being the co- chair since 2006 and joining with general kelley and myself to do this. thank you. >> thank you. i became involved in the council out of self-interest. b
environment. >>> looking to grab a big win today. it gets tougher with tom brady and the new england patriots on the schedule for next sun apsunday night. they will keep an eye on collin kaepernak and they will take them on at 1:05 and if mario can't place because after bad shoulder. >> following "mornings on 2" this morning, it is fox nfl sunday and then cincinnati against the ben gallons. >>> bring a toy with you. volunteers will be at candlestick park collecting unwrapped toys. it is all part of the operation dream toy drive. they will be donateed to thousands of children who live in san francisco public housing. >>> mysterious light in the sky over texas. now a debate over what caused it. >> if you are looking to hit the slopes. things are looking good. we will tell you about the sierra snow and why conditions there are unique. >> filling into the bay area sunday, i will tell you what to expect, coming up. . >>> well, a mysterious light show in the texas skies have a lot of people talking. officials are looking into whether a meteor touched down but the weather service now said the fire b
as their environment, or industrial transportation, heating ventilation. so you've got a security company and what we consider to be the core of this, in many ways. significant buyback of shares, and pay dividends. but they're not moving it up, they're paying it in march. >> a new ceo comes in, listed the pelts. why should you buy anything with the pelts involved. this is work for "mad money," after pelts provided it. after. you're up 11%. in other words, you don't know before it. versus the s&p being up 4%. this goes back to 2005. he's been just a terrific guy to invest with, as, by the way, everybody tells me he's a terrific guy. >> he is a nice guy. his activism, he sort of moved it to the performance side of things, and the operational side. it was started many ways by hines, which was a nasty fight, now he's on the board. he and johnson are buddy buddy. >> johnson told me he felt pelts' idea after initial resistance, that pelts said his ideas were great. >> best buy, one of the big losers this morning. you point out merrill has a note telling a lot of people what they probably already know, fina
in today's challenging environment. unless you have the right perspective. bny mellon wealth management has the vision and experience to look beyond the obvious. we'll uncover opportunities, find hidden risk, and make success a reality. bny mellon wealth management >> greta: 11:00 is almost here, time for last call. a new home for a monkey discovered lost in an ikea parking lot. he wandered around dressed in a coat and diaper. he spent 30 minutes wandering the parking lot before being captured. it's against the law to own
what was right for the environment or pub lip education. i'm a public school kid. my dad was on the school board. i have three sisters, two of them public schoolteachers here in florida. i have a heart for that kind of thing. people have told me for a long time, chris, charlie, you've been a democrat. you just didn't know it. >> well, i think they should. if they were reich me and sort of middle of the road and common sense republicans and they see what the leadership of the republican party is doing today, they ought to switch. they ought to become democrats. it's probably more true to their heart and their feeling if they're really more of a moderate-type republican. why won't they compromise? why won't they cooperate? why won't they do the kinds of things that the americans need and have done. this is the perfect example of it. >> i'm an optimist. i hope that that continues. >> well, come see me if you decide to run for governor. we ale have a nice platform right here. thank you so much. up next, the latest siting of milt romney in a place you'd never expect. never. th
people, faith community, environment lists there telling the legislature that right to work is bad for michigan, will hurt our families and hurt our state. >> now, joy, the fight ahead, because i wanted to establish there was incidents, but it was mostly peaceful. and the fight ahead must be peaceful. michigan's gop and the union challenges recalls ballot initiatives. where does the fight ahead lead? >> i think that the unions are obviously squaring for a fight. just real quickly, rev, it is ironic to me that fox news, which is a network that claim that had the tea party was mischaracterized because people showed racist signs that were actually there is trying to refrain this entire fight to fit their old narrative of unions being political thugs. i think what unions are going to have to do now is use the infrastructure that they built for the 2012 election. and, more effectively, deploy that infrastructure in a midterm. that's been one of the failings, really, of democrats, typically. but really with the labor movemeunion movement, in midterms u it tends to fall off. not this time
on the variable you're looking at. throughout the arctic environment system. >> reporter: 97% of the ice sheet covering greenland, another record, that area losing ice five times faster now than it was in the early '90s. >> we know that melting of ice in greenland can contribute to sea level rising around the world. >> reporter: in the last two decades those levels have grown by 20%. a trend scientists say long-term could be devastating. >> most of the people around the world live in coastal areas. that's where ports are. and they are at sea level. even small changes in sea level rise can displace millions of people. >> reporter: a group that includes more than half of the u.s. population, which lives within 50 miles of the coast. jay gray, nbc news. >>> what do you think? >> for sure, the more we really need to talk about this as a global problem. but for sure, with any weather event we're in, it just does put an exclamation mark behind it. we need to do what we can do to get ahead of it. >> the pictures are certainly telling. >> right. very telling and it's only when we get those big storms,
of their environment, disinvestment of their local economic development. of course, i wouldn't believe what you said. you're asking the fox to watch the henhouse essentially. so there is a lot of investment in telling people, you know -- not telling them anything, right? chemicals are looked at like trade secrets, so you put tons of chemicals potentially into the water table, and you're not telling them because it could help the competition. >> look. there are real environmental challenges with fracking. they are real. they are measurable. we are getting a handle on these, but the idea that they are infecting water tables is a bit overwrought. we've had 40,000 fracked in the country. the epa has has found one example of some sort of water table activity in wyoming. even they're not sure about that one. it seems the water table -- now, a greenhouse gas effect of loose methane, that's real. in terms of water that'sle coming up, recyclable water that's coming up at brine after the process is real. we have to separate what's real from the fake ones. you know what i'm saying? >> let's do that. i think th
double standard when it comes to young people from the most disadvantaged and troubled environments. there is so much to talk about. in an area we have been talking about on the skilled work force or how much there is a skill gap, i think this is a critical issue. i think that for us to have clear policies, we need to do a little better in clearly defining the challenge. first of all, i don't think there is any question that the main reason we are having higher unemployment right now is not structural. it is fundamentally cyclical, fundamentally the lack of demand that is still in our economy as we recover from the great recession. that said, that awareness, that recognition that ben bernanke and former cea lazear should not undermine that we face temporary or futures skills gaps but there is three reasons we should be focused on this. number one, even the unemployment today that is fundamentally about cyclical demand can easily become the next structural skills problem of the future. we know that one of the challenges we face right now in our economy is not just lowering unemployme
and troubled environments. environments. there is so much to talk about. in an area we have been talking about on the skilled work force or how much there is a skill gap, i think this is a critical issue. i think that for us to have clear policies, we need to do a little better in clearly defining the challenge. first of all, i don't think there is any question that the main reason we are having higher unemployment right now is not structural. it is fundamentally cyclical, fundamentally the lack of demand that is still in our economy as we recover from the great recession. that said, that awareness, that recognition that ben bernanke and former cea sheriff lazar -- cea chair lazear should not undermine that we face temporary or futures skills gaps but there is three reasons we should be focused on this. number one, even the unemployment today that is fundamentally about cyclical demand can easily become the next structural skills problem of the future. we know that one of the challenges we face right now in our economy is not just lowering unemployment, but lower and long-term unemployment, an
's challenging environment. unless you have the right perspective. bny mellon wealth management has the vision and experience to look beyond the obvious. we'll uncover opportunities, find hidden risk, and make success a reality. bny mellon wealth management so we created the extraordinarily comfortable sleep number experience. around a bed with dualair technology that allows you to adjust to the support your body needs - each of your bodies. our sleep professionals will help you find your sleep number setting. exclusively at a sleep number store. sleep number. comfort individualized. this holiday season, give the gift that's magical: the innovative airfit adjustable pillow at special 30% savings. >> greta: get on your feet. that's exactly what one former senator is doing to avoid the fiscal cliff. in a new web video, senator alan simpson dancing gangnam style to get his debt reduction message out to young people. >> stop instagramming your breakfast and tweeting your problems and getting on youtube so you can see began nagangnamstyle. start using those precious social media skills to go out an
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the environment in which people can explore literature especially. i think that there aren't enough programs like this around the country. i wish there were more. the literary community in albany is quite rich, and we're in kind of feedback loop with it. i don't think such an operation as the writer's institute could have been created in the first place without there being not only a strong group of writers, find sort of an arc from down toward columbia county where a lot of new york city writers have weekend homes all the way up to saratoga and beyond. we have places like yado, the writer's colony there and writers' groups in hudson, new york, east and west into western massachusetts and west to syracuse. that's the audience sort of circumference that we work with. so when you go back and you find a general population quite proud of albany's connections to henry james and herman melville or even brett hart -- a story writer -- or just, you know, a little bit further east over to wave to emily dickenson or a little bit further south to say hi to our old friend walt whitman or edith wharton. when
: the state department today also blaming the assayed regime for creating an environment where they say these groups can prosper. >> shepard: you have new information about weapons moving from libya into syria? >> reporter: fox news has learned that the cia as well as other intelligence agencies have been working with libyan militias after it was claimed qaddafi's program was not shut do i know idown in 2004. u.s. officials are insisted there's quote, no quid pro quo on the search, including the movement of weapons. tonight the cia had no public comment on fox's reporting. >> shepard: thanks very much. >>> an enormously popular mexican american singer and reality star now confirmed dead after a plane crash. investigators say jenni rivera was among the passengers on a private leer jet that slammed into the ground shortly after taking off in northern mexico. rivera's brother said there's almost nothing left of that plane. >> the plane is totaled. nobody inside survived. the bodies are unrecognizable according to what they're telling us. monterey officials are saying that they need at leas
, creating a business environment that allows for innovation. lowering the federal deficit actually false down to 40. not as much confidence there as a part on the other side. we been said the training faces a number of challenges including but not limited to large budget deficits, national debt, slower economic recovery, high unemployment, deep political divide on many issues. do you believe we will overcome these challenges in the foreseeable future as we've done in the past, or do you think these are unique set of challenges that are so serious that we might not be able to overcome those challenges? two-thirds of voters, 67%, say we will be able to do that. 31% have concerns about it. look at the bars across the bottom. the ones like younger voters, 18-29, confident we'll get there. african-american voters, 85%. hispanics 66. and those are the fundamentals of the democratic party, 85% of democrats saying it will improve. in which of the following closest to coming to think the president should take, short-term, long-term? a vision and approach focusing on long-term goals for the future
and let me go into an environment and go kind of gambling around in that and suddenly find, you know what, i sort of like it and i'm watching it. i still think that is a huge park of the american television experience, and i think it gets sold short when you get techno ecstatic talking about anytime, anywhere. i do still think a lot of americans love the enjoyment of escapism and passivity and being able to just kind of rumor around the tv jungle of finding the things that they did not know were there. >> michael powell and the future of television to 98:00 eastern on "the communicators" on c-span2. >> a forum on the iranian nuclear program. part of an event recently hosted by the foundation for defense of democracy here in washington d.c. this is just over 40 minutes. >> great. thanks very much, david. thank you to all of you. thank you, senator casey. grateful for your remarks and service. we are going to do a topic that is going to sound technical, non-proliferation policy in the wake of the arab spring, but i want to put this to some human terms. this is the sum of all of your panel.
, not fulfil this will go into the political process and create a contentious environment. number four, the issue of gridlock. i will just mention it. the current political regime his work place. the teacher unions controlled education policy. the plaintiffs in the reform, environmental groups that lack energy resources and so on. this is handled the story. these are what economists call rent seeking groups. they control or seek to control the distribution of resources to secure income for the members which wouldn't generate wealth on their own. they suggest economies grow more slowly as much groups will supply and a gain influence over the political process. assuming the resources, reforms this is one reason the u.s. economy grew so loud rapidly, germany and japan took off after world war ii to read these conflicts to strip a network of interest groups that might have blocked the development. obviously we don't want to have the board with interest to the system. but a political people can change in the party regime could accomplish that as the sun. this man is one of the contributions
have to reduce the debt, we have to reduce taxes, reduce regulation, create an environment in which people can go out and create jobs and hire more workers and then we can lower the unemployment rate and this will not be an issue anymore. host: michael tanner of the cato institute, and michael bivens of the economic policy institute. up next, will continue our "america by the numbers" series. the future of u.s. energy production in 2014. we will be joined by adam sieminski and frank verrastro. >> i think writers institute is something that is very important within the culture. we are a culture of words, of voices. words are key to our imagination, our capacity to invasion -- envision things. we ourselves are not completely tied to print on the page, but there is no other art forms so readily accessible other than perhaps film, which we work with, too. there is something in literature that just captures the human spirit. >> this weekend, joined "book tv" and "american history tv" as we look at the historic and literary life of new york's capital, albany. >> the chiefs of staff had to
to listen yet, so we've just got to wait. that's obviously not a great environment to move things along. the optimists on both sides think we're going to get a deal, not by christmas, but by new year's. if you ask people, what's the next step? what gets things moving? it's still complicated, and nobody has a consensus on that. the biggest challenge is how you strike a deal this year that has some things left undone for next year. and there's all sorts of people thinking about different kinds of triggers, different kind of things that say, well, if congress doesn't do x, then y kicks in, but there's no agreement on what those need to be. there's going to be more revenue, but things like entitlement reform, tax reform, those things are still very unsettled. >> so senator tom coburn yesterday on "morning joe" became the latest to break rank, saying he could support president obama's tax proposal. coburn joins a growing chorus of republicans from outside the house of representatives, urging house leadership to clear the way for a broad deal that would include tax increases on the wealthy. h
, environment and essential services and vulnerable populations with smart planning and well-designed recovery and rebuilding tools. we have the ability to reduce the consequences of severe weather. by mitigating flood risk through smarter land use guidelines, building codes and flood protection improvements. the state of new york has requested $9 billion for mitigation measures from the administration. the state of new jersey is seeking another $7 billion for the same purpose. i commend governor quomeow and governor christie for -- cuomo and governor christie for including strategic needs in their funding request. both of these leaders have demonstrated inble compassion and concern for the people who they represent and have been highly effective in their leadership since the disaster began and it may also include mayor bloomberg, mayor booker and many other local officials that stepped up and did the job they were elected to do. i hope -- i look forward to hearing from our witnesses today. my colleagues who i have the deepest respect for and have been engaged in many conversations with them,
influence on foreign fighters and jihadists and syria. the space to positively influenced the environment is narrowing and may be closing. the establishment of the new opposition group combined with better understanding of the armed population provides a renewed opportunity for a more assertive u.s. policy. let me propose a couple of ideas. number one, first, the u.s. must lead an effort to better coordinate international support for the moderate syrian opposition. several countries over the past 20 months have provided different degrees of military political and humanitarian assistance to syrian opposition groups inside of the country. which has led to a common complaint from those in the opposition. they say that the u.s. and the international community have applied considerable pressure on the syrian opposition to called less and coordinate. yet these countries providing assistance to the opposition are sometimes not coordinated among themselves. and sometimes work at cross purposes. they want us to keep our own advice, which i think is a fair statement. a lack of international coordin
. they encouraged more science and engineers, which is fifpblete but they weren't in a creative environment where they could do good work. democracy, as again the founders would have known this, you can't just be a science and engineer in a democracy to look way over the cliff to the mountains and beyond. so i'm very disturbed now to say that one great state university is talking about creating incentives for people to do science and engineering as undergraduates as against in effect creating disincentives for people to do humanities. you have to have people who can look beyond the current crisis. that also has been part of the american middle class, new ideas. >> i agree with that. i would like to see more of an emphasis on the science and math. i guess -- we are going to in terms of particularly in the k through eighth grade so these younger kids can look up to those role models and say is this something i want to not run from? >> one of the great stories, physics in the 1960's, young physicistsous learning how to do problem sets as graduate students, they started going back to answer the quest
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 55 (some duplicates have been removed)